G. Welling, S. Giddins - Side-Stepping Mainline Theory (K-5707)

K-5707

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Spend more study time on what’s really decisive in your games!
The average chess player spends too much time on studying opening theory. In his day, World Chess Champion Emanuel Lasker argued that improving amateurs should spend about 5% of their study time on openings. These days club players are probably closer to 80%, often focusing on opening lines that are popular among grandmasters.

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22,95 €

Data sheet

Language versionsEnglish
Author / AuthorsSteve Giddins, Gerard Welling
PublisherNew In Chess
Publication date1st edition 2019
Pages272
ISBN9789056918699
HardcoverNo
PaperbackYes
DownloadableNo
Width17 cm / 6.69 inch
Height23.5 cm / 9.25 inch

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Club players shouldn’t slavishly copy the choices of grandmasters. GMs need to squeeze every drop of advantage from the opening and therefore play highly complex lines that require large amounts of memorization. The main objective for club players should be to emerge from the opening with a reasonable position, from which you can simply play chess and pit your own tactical and positional understanding against that of your opponent.

Gerard Welling and Steve Giddins recommend the Old Indian-Hanham Philidor set-up as a basis for both Black and White. They provide ideas and strategies that can be learned in the shortest possible time, require the bare minimum of maintenance and updating, and lead to rock-solid positions that you will know how to handle. By adopting a similar set-up for both colours, with similar plans and techniques, you will further reduce study time.

Side-stepping Mainline Theory will help you to focus on what is really decisive in the vast majority of non-grandmaster games: tactics, positional understanding and endgame technique.

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G. Welling, S. Giddins - Side-Stepping Mainline Theory (K-5707)

G. Welling, S. Giddins - Side-Stepping Mainline Theory (K-5707)

Spend more study time on what’s really decisive in your games!
The average chess player spends too much time on studying opening theory. In his day, World Chess Champion Emanuel Lasker argued that improving amateurs should spend about 5% of their study time on openings. These days club players are probably closer to 80%, often focusing on opening lines that are popular among grandmasters.

Content

009 Authors’ preface and acknowledgements
010 Introduction
015 Chapter 1 – The keys to successful opening play
021 Chapter 2 – The Old Indian against 1.d4
095 Chapter 3 – The Old Indian against Flank Openings
107 Chapter 4 – The Philidor against 1.e4
167 Chapter 5 – The system as White
221 Chapter 6 - Tables of the main variations
263 Bibliography
265 Index of names

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